Tag Archives: Wendy Pratt

Spelt Magazine – new kid on the block

It’s a thrill when your work makes it onto the pages of a brand new magazine. How will it look? Who’ll be in it? Will it last? So hurrah for Spelt, edited by Wendy Pratt. I can answer the first two questions – it looks great, it has some excellent work inside. Whether it will last is in the lap of the gods – ie the reader!

Spelt celebrates the rural experience through poetry and creative non fiction,” says Wendy in her first editorial.

“We want to see Spelt sitting not just in bookshops, but pubs and cafes, in gardens and tractor cabs, at poetry readings, festivals and spread out on a table at your local library. We also want to create something colourful, because nature doesn’t happen in black and white, and nature is at the heart of this magazine.”

Poets in this issue include Bob Beagrie, Claire Booker, Carole Bromley, Stephen Boyce, Pat Edwards, John Foggin, Mary Gilonne, Janet Hatherley, Oz Hardwick, Jenna Plewes, Gareth Writer-Davis and Lynne Wycherley.

Foolscap size and glossy, it’s the sort of magazine you might expect to see in a doctor’s waiting room (wouldn’t that be nice?). Each poem is given a full page with its own illustrative image and a picture of the poet with their bio and contact details. Generous, or what?

And true to its coffee table spirit, Spelt has four regular columnists. Its creative non-fiction writers take on such diverse subjects as Mary Earnshaw on wolves in Yellow Stone Park; a wacky piece by self-confessed vampire and Saboteur Award winning, Steve Nash; insights into archaeology by Electra Rhodes; living with M.E. in the village of Coalbrookdale by Kathryn Anna Marshall; and the ins and outs of eking a living as a trawler fisherman. There is also an in-depth interview with Irish poet Aoife Lyall whose first collection ‘Mother, Nature’ is published by Bloodaxe. I was incredibly impressed by her work when she read at the Spelt zoom launch earlier this month. There’s something about the emotional depth of her work, combined with that Irish lilt, that I found irresistible.

Co-editor, Steve Nash, has created films of many of the poems in the first issue, including my own ‘The Lightness of Words’ which can be viewed on Spelt’s YouTube channel at the following link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s92NA-n2l6g

Spelt could not have got off the ground without its crowd-funding backers. So, over to the reader, now! Do please buy a copy if you can (£7.00 including p&p) and you’ll help the green shoots to grow and thrive (sorry, couldn’t resist that one).

And there’s still time to submit your work to Issue 2 (closing date April 30th). To submit poetry and creative non-fiction, buy a copy of the magazine, or donate please visit: https://speltmagazine.com/

Dreamcatcher – worth a pile of beans!

Dreamcatcher 40_0001During the siege of Leningrad, people flocked to the libraries for nourishment. Here, we flock to the supermarkets for toilet rolls. Perhaps the Russians have something to teach us.

I’m fortunate (so far) in having food and books enough. And my contributor’s copy of Dreamcatcher 40 has just arrived, pulsating with verbal and visual treats.  It’s Wendy Pratt’s final issue as Editor, and she’s really pushed the boat out.

It includes some cracking short stories: Mark Jarman’s fascinating take on Shanghai; Kevan Youde’s mouth-watering sea voyage; a tale from Down Under by Christian McCulloch and something for Movie buffs from Mark Wasserman.

Poets featured include Claire Booker, Nick Boreham, Pamela Coren, Sandra Galton, Yvonne Hendrie, Michael Henry, Gary Jude, Mark Anthony Kaye, David Lewitzky, Karen Little, Jenny McRobert,  Jeremy Platt, Florian Rose, Iain Twiddy and Alessio Zanelli.Dreamcatcher 40_0002

The ravishing artwork in this issue has been selected from oil paintings by David Baumforth. Born in York, David’s inspiration is the ‘bitter beauty’ of England’s North East coast.  His technique is Turnerian, but the modern visual risk-taker is very much in evidence too.

Dreamcatcher 40_0003“I paint how I’ve always painted,” explains Baumforth, “and that’s with a focus on the truth of what I see in front of me. Yorkshire and its coastline are a constant source of inspiration. My last collections are very well received, and though that is gratifying, success or lack of it can be a distraction.”

Wise words indeed. And what fantastic use of colour. Clearly a painter I need to find out more about. So, thank you, Dreamcatcher for introducing him to me.

This issue also carries reviews of Derrida’s Monkey by Nell Farrell, and The Unknown Civilian by Antony Owen. Plus a very handy guide by Alan Gillott to three, on-line resources for writers: Write Out Loud, The Poetry Kit, and Rhyme Zone.

To buy a copy of Dreamcatcher 40, subscribe to the magazine (two issues a year), or check submissions windows, visit: Dreamcatcher

 

Poem on stolen pavements in Prole magazine

Prole (issue 13)When did you last look down and think – hey, that’s an expensive bit of paving stone? The history of our footsteps (and the price on its head)  features in my poem Stone-whisperers out now in the latest issue of Prole magazine.

You can enjoy mind-expanding poetry from a fine array of fellow poets including Wendy Klein, Howard Wright, Lisa Kelly’s hilarious skit on mail-order brides, Bethany W. Pope’s villanelle on her vagina and Sarah Doyle’s sparkling response to Browning’s My Last Duchess.

Prole is a quarterly literary magazine which carries short fiction and poetry. To submit your work or to buy a copy of Prole (issue 13) please click on the following link:  http://www.prolebooks.co.uk

Ho,ho,ho – it’s the season to celebrate!

Icy winds may moan (and by golly they do) but nothing stops good poetry reaching its readers.

South Bank Poetry - front coverClaire Booker had plenty to celebrate this month, with poems published in South Bank Poetry and Prole literary magazines.

South Bank Poetry launched its 14th issue to a packed audience at the Poetry Cafe last week  – so crowded I got shoe-horned in behind the lift!  Along with a number of other contributors, including Paul Stephenson, Chris Hardy and Peter Ebsworth, I was invited to read my poems:  ‘Sudden Snow’ explores the existential aspects of building a snowman, whilst ‘Forbidden Fruit, SW16’ is a cautionary tale of elderberry-picking on a south London street.

South Bank Poetry magazine is available from a number of bookshops, including Foyles at the Royal Festival Hall, and the National Theatre bookshop. Or you can order from South Bank Poetry, 74 Sylvan Road, SE19 2RZ (price £4.30 incl p&p).

Prole (Issue 9)The ever excellent Prole notched up issue number 9 this month, which includes a Claire Booker poem about South Africa alongside work by Wendy Pratt, Maitreyabandhu and Rafael Miguel Montes.

Visit the Prole website at:  www.prolebooks.co.uk to order a copy of Issue 9, or to set up a subscription.